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Bucher Law Group, LLC

Jefferson County social security disability attorney

Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits can be a boon for employees who are no longer able to work, and under certain circumstances, they may also assist an employee’s spouse. If you and your family are in need of disability assistance, it is important for you to understand who can receive SSDI benefits and how much you may be entitled to. An experienced attorney can help you navigate the complexities of this important issue. 

Spousal Eligibility for Social Security Disability Benefits   

While SSDI benefits are primarily meant to support an employee who has contributed to the plan through payroll deductions, they can sometimes also support the employee’s family. You may be eligible for up to 50 percent of the amount of your spouse’s benefit in specific situations, including:

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Ozaukee County Social Security Disability benefits attorney

The Social Security Administration (SSA) provides two types of benefit programs to adults and children who may need financial assistance if they are disabled and unable to work. The SSA’s Social Security disability insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs both provide benefits, but the eligibility requirements for the two differ. In some situations, a child who is disabled may be eligible for benefits under the SSI program. However, there is a process that must be followed and documentation that must be completed before such benefits can be paid.

Eligibility Requirements  

In order for a child to be eligible to receive benefits from the SSI program, he or she must be under the age of 18 or 22 if he or she is enrolled in school, has a debilitating illness, disability, or condition, and falls within the income eligibility limits. Income limits for a child who is not blind state that the child cannot earn more than $1,260 a month in 2020, while a child who is blind cannot earn more than $2,110 a month.

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Milwaukee County social security disability attorney

The Social Security Administration (SSA) exists to help Americans when they need it the most. Two of the administration’s most popular programs, social security disability insurance (SSDI) and supplemental security income (SSI), are both available to disabled individuals who have little to no financial resources. Eligibility requirements differ for the programs, which is why some individuals may qualify for one program but not the other. One of the requirements involves how much an individual worked before he or she was injured or became ill. Not having enough work experience can be one reason why your SSDI claim may be denied.

Understanding SSA Work Credits

In order to receive benefits through the SSA, you must have worked a certain period of time and earned enough money to be eligible. The SSA measures your contributions through work credits, which are based on your total yearly income. One work credit is earned when you make $1,410 in wages, but you can only earn up to four work credits per year. Once you have earned $5,640, you have earned your four work credits for the year.

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Walworth County Social Security Disability Insurance attorney

Not a lot of people think about what would happen if they became disabled. According to the Social Security Administration, one out of every four of today's 20-year-olds will become disabled before reaching the age of 67. How would you provide for yourself and your family if you are no longer able to work? This is where the Social Security Administration (SSA) comes in. The SSA provides two programs that help Americans who are disabled: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Although these two programs are similar, there are a few key differences in how they operate. 

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

SSI is a benefit that is paid out to certain individuals based on need. This benefit provides income for children and adults who are disabled and who have limited income and resources. This is the biggest difference between SSI and SSDI. You do have to meet eligibility requirements to receive SSI. To qualify, you generally have to be over the age of 65, blind or disabled and have limited income and/or resources. Children or young adults may also be eligible for SSI if they meet the definition of blind or disabled.

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Racine County social security disability attorney

You may know someone who is disabled or read about it in the news, but you probably do not think it could happen to you. According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), around one in four adults will be disabled by the time they reach the age of 67. Becoming disabled can be an extremely scary experience, especially if you do not have a financial safety net to rely on. Fortunately, the SSA can provide individuals with that assurance. Each year, millions of disabled Americans apply for Social Security disability benefits, but only about one-third of all applications are approved. Each situation and application is different, but here are a few common reasons why your Social Security disability application may be denied:

You Do Not Meet Basic Eligibility Requirements

Social Security disability benefits are considered to be a public welfare program. This means that you must meet income requirements in order to be a recipient. Part of the definition of being disabled means your earnings are limited and generally not enough to support yourself. According to the SSA, if your earnings are more than $1,260 each month, you generally cannot be considered disabled.

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