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Bucher Law Group, LLC
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Dodge County weapons violation attorney

One of the things that makes the United States different from many other countries is that there are provisions guaranteeing citizens the right to own firearms written in the country’s Constitution. Even so, each state is allowed the freedom to create its own laws pertaining to firearms and other weapons. This has led to a disparity across states regarding what is and is not legal when it comes to firearm ownership and possession. Not only do you have to follow state laws, but you must also follow federal laws. Violating any state or federal firearms laws can result in serious charges that can carry stiff penalties. If you are a Wisconsin gun owner, the following are a few things you should know.

Requirements for Firearm Possession in Wisconsin

If you are a resident of Wisconsin, there are certain requirements you must meet before you can legally own and possess a firearm. Wisconsin law states that firearm owners:

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Waukesha County spousal maintenance attorney

Getting divorced is often a long and tedious process for many couples. There are many things you have to do before you can officially call it quits. Many couples share nearly everything when they are married, including finances. While this can be convenient and useful during a marriage, it can prove to be a hassle during a divorce when you must disentangle your and your spouse’s finances. Divorce is difficult not only because of the financial aspect, but also because it is an emotional process as well. Major life transitions can be much easier with preparation, and divorce is no exception. Below are a few practical ways you can prepare for your Wisconsin divorce.

Understand Your Financial Situation

It is not uncommon for one spouse to be more knowledgeable of the finances in a marriage. If you are getting a divorce, it is important that you have a clear picture of what your finances look like. First, you should gather all of your financial documents, such as bank statements, credit card statements, as well as information about investment and retirement accounts. In addition, it is important to know about any assets you may own, such as real estate, vehicles, or other expensive items. You should then determine if you have any debt for which you and your spouse are responsible, such as credit card balances, a mortgage, vehicle loans, plus other outstanding bank or personal loans. This can give you a clearer picture of what you are working with when it comes time to divide your assets and debts.

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Jefferson County weapons charges defense attorney

In 1999, the country was in shock when the nation’s first major school shooting took place at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. Two teenage boys shot and killed 13 people and injured more than 20 others before they committed suicide. Since then, more events involving gun violence have taken place, many in schools. In the past couple of years, there have been dozens of incidents in which high school students have committed acts of violence using a weapon at school. In one recent event, a Waukesha, Wisconsin teen threatened fellow students with a pellet gun, resulting in an altercation with a police officer. 

Teen Shot Three Times By Police

Early in December of 2019, a Waukesha South High School student brought a pellet gun into school to scare the other students because he “was tired of being picked on,” according to authorities. The boy became upset when another student asked him about his plans for his 18th birthday. According to the charges filed, the teen pulled a pellet gun that looked like a handgun from his backpack and pointed it directly toward the student’s head.

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Milwaukee County criminal defense attorney

Our founding fathers established certain requirements when it came to creating a new country and a new government. Many of those provisions dealt with the individual and collective freedoms of citizens of the United States. These rights were given to people through the U.S. Constitution and its amendments. Some of the most important rights to those accused of criminal offenses in this country are referred to as “Miranda rights” after the conclusion of the 1966 Supreme Court case, Arizona v. Miranda. This landmark case established the requirement that suspects must be informed of their rights, a protocol used by all police forces around the country.

What Are Miranda Rights?

Your Miranda rights are those rights that are guaranteed to you in the Fifth and Sixth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. These include the right to remain silent, the right to an attorney, and the right against self-incrimination. The case Arizona v. Miranda established that all police officers are required to inform you of these rights. All police departments have a different variation of the text used, but it typically sounds something like this:

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Waukesha County OWI homicide defense attorney

When it comes to drunk driving laws, Wisconsin is relatively lenient compared to other states. In fact, Wisconsin is the only state in the country in which a first-time DUI offense is merely a ticket, rather than a criminal charge. Even when a person reaches his or her second, third, or even fourth conviction of Operating While Intoxicated (OWI), the sentence typically does not involve jail time. Rather, probation is usually given to those offenders, even if their driving privileges were revoked. Jail time can be expected, however, if there are certain aggravating factors present in the situation to warrant a need for incarceration. Aggravating factors in a Wisconsin OWI case can include causing bodily harm or injury to another person, committing OWI with a child in the vehicle, or one of the most serious charges: homicide while committing OWI.

Charges for Homicide While Driving Under the Influence

In all 50 states, operating a vehicle while you are under the influence of drugs or alcohol is illegal. Adding an aggravating factor to OWI, such as killing another person, makes the charges even more serious. In Wisconsin, a person commits the offense of homicide by intoxicated use of vehicle when he or she causes the death of another person due to the handling of the vehicle while he or she was under the influence of alcohol or any type of drug, had a BAC of 0.08 or more, or if he or she had a BAC of 0.04 or more and was driving a commercial motor vehicle (CMV). 

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