355 Austin Circle, Suite 110, Delafield, WI 53018
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Bucher Law Group, LLC
Recent blog posts

Walworth County Social Security Disability Insurance attorney

Not a lot of people think about what would happen if they became disabled. According to the Social Security Administration, one out of every four of today's 20-year-olds will become disabled before reaching the age of 67. How would you provide for yourself and your family if you are no longer able to work? This is where the Social Security Administration (SSA) comes in. The SSA provides two programs that help Americans who are disabled: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Although these two programs are similar, there are a few key differences in how they operate. 

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

SSI is a benefit that is paid out to certain individuals based on need. This benefit provides income for children and adults who are disabled and who have limited income and resources. This is the biggest difference between SSI and SSDI. You do have to meet eligibility requirements to receive SSI. To qualify, you generally have to be over the age of 65, blind or disabled and have limited income and/or resources. Children or young adults may also be eligible for SSI if they meet the definition of blind or disabled.

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Waukesha County property division attorney

Getting a divorce can be stressful for many reasons, but one of the leading causes of this anxiety can be the financial side of things. While many spouses may experience financial difficulties during their marriage, these issues can also follow a person during and after their divorce. When you file for divorce, you must separate yourself entirely from your spouse. This can sometimes prove to be difficult, especially because many married couples have joint bank accounts, assets, credit cards, and other debts. Wisconsin is a community property state, meaning all assets, income, and debt are considered the property of both spouses and must be divided between them during a divorce.

Determining Property to Be Divided

If you and your spouse each acquired certain property before your marriage, that property will be considered separate, non-marital property that is not subject to division during divorce. Any assets or debts acquired during your marriage are considered marital property under Wisconsin law. All marital property, including assets you own and debts you owe, is subject to division between the two of you. However, there are a few exceptions to that rule. Wisconsin law states that any property acquired as a gift from another person or through the death of another person remains the property of the specified spouse, no matter when the property was acquired.

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Walworth County weapons violation defense attorney

For many pro-gun-ownership activists, the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution is often the go-to for debates over who should be permitted to own a firearm. According to the Second Amendment, all citizens have the right to bear arms, but the government has reserved the right to regulate ownership to the individual states. Each state and even the federal government has placed restrictions on gun ownership, specifying when an individual may be forbidden from owning or possessing firearms. Violating these laws can result in serious consequences in Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Gun Ownership Laws

In Wisconsin, there are certain people who are not permitted to purchase or possess a firearm. If you are caught in possession of a gun when you are not permitted to do so, you may face criminal charges. You could face illegal possession charges if you own or possess a firearm and you:

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Milwaukee County OWI defense attorney

Being arrested for operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated (OWI) is a serious offense. Although Wisconsin is known for having relatively lax OWI laws, you can still face significant consequences if you are convicted. Even if you do not face jail time, you can expect to pay a good amount in fines and surcharges, and you also face a six- to nine-month driver’s license revocation. In some cases, such as those involving multiple OWIs, penalties may include jail time, which could amount to months or even years behind bars. Hiring a skilled Wisconsin OWI defense attorney is one way you can increase your chances of obtaining a favorable outcome in your OWI case. Your attorney will look at your case as a whole and be able to tell you which defense strategy is the most appropriate for your situation. Below are a few common ways in which you can defend yourself against OWI charges.

You Were Pulled Over Unlawfully

One possible defense to an OWI charge is that you were not pulled over legally in the first place. Before law enforcement can initiate a traffic stop, they must have probable cause to do so. This means they must have reason to believe you were breaking the law before they stopped you. A police officer typically gains probable cause by witnessing a driver swerving or driving erratically, but if you did not do anything out of the ordinary, the officer may not have actually had a legitimate reason to pull you over.

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Milwaukee County weapons violation attorney

Compared to many other states, Wisconsin has relatively lenient laws when it comes to firearms. While some states require all firearm owners to obtain a permit or license to legally purchase and possess firearms, Wisconsin does not. If you are legally permitted to own a firearm under federal law, you must pass a background check, and then you will be permitted to purchase a firearm. Even though Wisconsin’s gun laws may not seem as strict as other states’ laws, Wisconsin does take weapons violations seriously. Being convicted of a gun law violation could result in serious criminal penalties that could affect you for the rest of your life. If you are a firearm owner in Wisconsin, it is important that you understand the laws regarding carrying your gun in public.

Open Carry

Wisconsin is an open-carry state. This means that anyone who is legally permitted to possess or own a firearm is also permitted to carry his or her firearm on his or her person, as long as it is not concealed. There are certain exceptions to this rule, however. In Wisconsin, you are not permitted to openly carry a firearm:

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