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Bucher Law Group, LLC
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Walworth County criminal defense attorney

If you made a mistake and are in trouble with the law, you may be feeling overwhelmed, scared, and worried. Depending on the type of crime you have been accused of committing, you may be facing expensive fines and even years behind bars in some cases. Having an attorney by your side throughout the criminal proceedings is important and crucial to a successful outcome. The importance of obtaining legal representation is even written in our constitution. We have a constitutional right to be appointed an attorney if we cannot afford a private lawyer. So how do criminal defense attorneys actually help defendants?

Benefits of Legal Counsel

When you are accused of committing a crime, representation by an attorney is extremely important. There are certain things that a lawyer knows how to do that could protect you if you have been accused of any offense. Lawyers also have extensive knowledge of the criminal justice system, which can help secure a favorable verdict. Here are a few ways that criminal defense attorneys help protect their clients’ rights:

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Milwaukee County OWI defense attorney

The state of Wisconsin remains the only state in the nation that does not criminalize first-time DUI offenses. Instead of it being a criminal charge, it is treated more like a traffic ticket. Drivers pay a fine, and while they do experience a six- to nine-month license suspension, they are also eligible for an occupational license immediately. Even so, law enforcement officials take operating while intoxicated (OWI) offenses rather seriously. That is why it is important to understand Wisconsin's Implied Consent law and how it affects sobriety tests in OWI traffic stops. 

Administering a Chemical Test

When a police officer pulls you over under the suspicion that you may be operating your vehicle while intoxicated (OWI), he or she will likely ask you what you have been doing and if you have been drinking. If anything about your conversation makes the officer think that you may be impaired, he or she may ask you to step out of the vehicle to conduct field sobriety tests, or you may be asked to take a portable breathalyzer test that will give an estimate of your blood-alcohol content (BAC). If the results of these tests or any other observations cause the officer to believe that you are intoxicated, you may be arrested. Upon your arrest, you will be taken back to the police station, where you will be asked to submit to an official chemical test to determine your blood-alcohol content (BAC). This is where you have a choice. You have the right to refuse the test, but you will face consequences if you do break the implied consent laws.

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Walworth County Social Security Disability Insurance attorney

Not a lot of people think about what would happen if they became disabled. According to the Social Security Administration, one out of every four of today's 20-year-olds will become disabled before reaching the age of 67. How would you provide for yourself and your family if you are no longer able to work? This is where the Social Security Administration (SSA) comes in. The SSA provides two programs that help Americans who are disabled: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Although these two programs are similar, there are a few key differences in how they operate. 

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

SSI is a benefit that is paid out to certain individuals based on need. This benefit provides income for children and adults who are disabled and who have limited income and resources. This is the biggest difference between SSI and SSDI. You do have to meet eligibility requirements to receive SSI. To qualify, you generally have to be over the age of 65, blind or disabled and have limited income and/or resources. Children or young adults may also be eligible for SSI if they meet the definition of blind or disabled.

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Waukesha County property division attorney

Getting a divorce can be stressful for many reasons, but one of the leading causes of this anxiety can be the financial side of things. While many spouses may experience financial difficulties during their marriage, these issues can also follow a person during and after their divorce. When you file for divorce, you must separate yourself entirely from your spouse. This can sometimes prove to be difficult, especially because many married couples have joint bank accounts, assets, credit cards, and other debts. Wisconsin is a community property state, meaning all assets, income, and debt are considered the property of both spouses and must be divided between them during a divorce.

Determining Property to Be Divided

If you and your spouse each acquired certain property before your marriage, that property will be considered separate, non-marital property that is not subject to division during divorce. Any assets or debts acquired during your marriage are considered marital property under Wisconsin law. All marital property, including assets you own and debts you owe, is subject to division between the two of you. However, there are a few exceptions to that rule. Wisconsin law states that any property acquired as a gift from another person or through the death of another person remains the property of the specified spouse, no matter when the property was acquired.

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Walworth County weapons violation defense attorney

For many pro-gun-ownership activists, the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution is often the go-to for debates over who should be permitted to own a firearm. According to the Second Amendment, all citizens have the right to bear arms, but the government has reserved the right to regulate ownership to the individual states. Each state and even the federal government has placed restrictions on gun ownership, specifying when an individual may be forbidden from owning or possessing firearms. Violating these laws can result in serious consequences in Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Gun Ownership Laws

In Wisconsin, there are certain people who are not permitted to purchase or possess a firearm. If you are caught in possession of a gun when you are not permitted to do so, you may face criminal charges. You could face illegal possession charges if you own or possess a firearm and you:

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